NPR logo

NASA Announces Plan to Hit Moon in 2008

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5334811/5334812" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
NASA Announces Plan to Hit Moon in 2008

Space

NASA Announces Plan to Hit Moon in 2008

NASA Announces Plan to Hit Moon in 2008

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5334811/5334812" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
An artist's concept shows the upper stage, left, being guided toward the moon before impacting.

An artist's concept shows the upper stage, left, being guided toward the moon before impacting at the south pole (right). NASA/John Frassanito and Associates hide caption

toggle caption NASA/John Frassanito and Associates

A new NASA mission to the moon will pelt the lunar surface in order to study plumes of dust — and search for ice crystals. The unmanned mission, slated for October 2008, will launch a lunar orbiter from NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla., using the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle.

The plan is to smash an object the weight of a sport utility vehicle into a crater on the moon, then fly a spacecraft through the resulting plume to search for evidence of ice. NASA said the mission is part of its plan to see if oxygen, hydrogen, or materials on the moon could be used to help support a trip to Mars.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.