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Cordoned Off, an Iraqi Town Relaxes

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Cordoned Off, an Iraqi Town Relaxes

Iraq

Cordoned Off, an Iraqi Town Relaxes

Cordoned Off, an Iraqi Town Relaxes

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5343150/5343151" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A town once remarkable for its heavy insurgent activity has become a haven for Sunnis fleeing sectarian violence in Baghdad. More than a thousand families have moved to Tarmiyah since the Samarrah bombing.

The military controls all entrances and exits to the farming town, on the banks of the Tigris about 30 miles northeast of Baghdad. There have been no terrorist incidents there since U.S. troops began walking the streets, having tea with locals, and eating with Sheikhs.

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