McClellan Out as White House Shake-Up Continues

White House Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove, left, and White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan

White House Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove, left, and outgoing White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan step off Air Force One in Montgomery, Ala., Wednesday. Reuters hide caption

itoggle caption Reuters

The man who has spoken for President Bush for nearly three years is leaving the pressroom podium, as Scott McClellan announces his resignation as White House press secretary. A part of the president's staff since his days as governor of Texas, McClellan became known for the daily briefings in which he often stayed relentlessly "on message."

Speaking alongside McClellan on the White House grounds, the president praised the job McClellan has done. "One of these days, he and I are going to be rocking on chairs in Texas, talking about the good old days," Bush said.

In another White House shift, President Bush's key strategic advisor, Karl Rove, will shed one of his administration jobs to make room for a new deputy chief of staff for policy development. Rove is expected to focus on boosting President Bush's low approval ratings, as well as gettin more involved in Republican elections around the country. Rove has been considered the president's most powerful political strategist for more than 12 years.

The moves are the latest since Josh Bolten became President Bush's new chief of staff. Tuesday, the president nominated U.S. Trade Representative Rob Portman to become the White House budget director. Bolten had previously served as director of the Office of Management and Budget.

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