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How the 1906 Quake Launched Earthquake Science

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How the 1906 Quake Launched Earthquake Science

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How the 1906 Quake Launched Earthquake Science

How the 1906 Quake Launched Earthquake Science

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One hundred years ago this week, a huge earthquake rocked San Francisco and gave birth to modern earthquake science. In a live broadcast from San Francisco's Exploratorium, guests discuss the 1906 quake and how the Bay Area will fare when another major seismic event occurs.

Guests:

Mary Lou Zoback, seismologist; regional coordinator, Northern California Earthquake Hazards Program; U.S. Geological Survey

Rich Eisner, regional administrator, coastal region; Governor's Office of Emergency Services

Charles Kircher, structural engineer, principal; Charles Kircher and Associates

Stephen Tobriner, author of Bracing for Disaster: Earthquake-Resistant Architecture and Engineering in San Francisco, 1838-1933, professor of architectural history at Berkeley