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Judge Rules on Legality of Web Surfing at Work

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Judge Rules on Legality of Web Surfing at Work

Judge Rules on Legality of Web Surfing at Work

Judge Rules on Legality of Web Surfing at Work

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  • Transcript

It's the law. Surfing the Web is the equivalent of talking on the phone or reading a newspaper. A judge in New York was called upon to weigh in on the matter when an employee of the New York City Department of Education was caught regularly checking out news and travel sites on the Web. An administrative judge, deciding what punishment to mete out to the 14-year veteran worker, recommended a mere reprimand. He ruled that since workers are allowed to chat on the phone if it doesn't interfere with their work, they should also be allowed to surf the Web.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Now it's the law. Surfing the Web is the equivalent of talking on the phone or reading a newspaper. That's what a judge ruled in matter involving a New York Department of Education employee. The worker got caught checking news updates and travel fares on the Web. The punishment, a mere reprimand. The judge ruled, since workers are allowed to chat on the phone if it doesn't interfere with their work, they should also be allowed to surf the Web.

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