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Rio Seeks to Deter Subway Groping

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Rio Seeks to Deter Subway Groping

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Rio Seeks to Deter Subway Groping

Rio Seeks to Deter Subway Groping

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Rio de Janeiro designates some subway cars for women only in a bid to deter a persistent problem: groping.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

The women of Rio were conveyed to work in pink-stripped coaches this week. The city began to run for-women-only subway cars so that women can ride without being groped, patted or pinched by the men of Rio.

News agencies reported that on the first day, many women applauded. The men stumbled unknowingly into their cars and were put out. One car in every 33 is designated for women only during weekday rush hours. Women passengers will control the access of men in the cars, calling for security guards if a man assumes he is so irresistible that go really mean stay. And when all the men have finally been turned out and the subway gets underway, they can draw the shades and then watch Desperate Housewives.

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