Civil-Rights Author Florence Mars Dies

Florence Mars, a Mississippi native who wrote about the slaying of three civil rights workers in her state by the Ku Klux Klan, died last week at 83. Her book, Witness in Philadelphia, tells the story of the murders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

DEBBIE ELLIOTT, host:

We'd also like to note the death of Florence Mars, a Mississippi native who wrote about the slayings of three civil rights workers in her state by the Ku Klux Klan. Mars died at her home in Philadelphia, Mississippi last week. She was 83.

Her book, Witness in Philadelphia, tells the story of the murders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, and reveals in chilling detail how the crime ripped at the soul of her hometown. Her book opens with the line, In Philadelphia, Mississippi, the basement of the past is not very deep.

Florence Mars was one of the few white citizens who cooperated with the FBI agents who descended on Mississippi after the murders, and she paid dearly for it. She was arrested, alienated from her church, and the Klan burned down her barn.

The last time I saw Florence Mars, she sat proudly in the Neshoba County courthouse last summer, watching as former Klan leader Edgar Ray Killen was finally convicted of manslaughter for orchestrating the killings. Florence Mars was a cattle owner, tree farmer, and photographer. She'll be buried in Philadelphia, Mississippi, on Thursday.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.