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U.S. Officials Close San Diego's Bike Border-Crossing

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U.S. Officials Close San Diego's Bike Border-Crossing

U.S. Officials Close San Diego's Bike Border-Crossing

U.S. Officials Close San Diego's Bike Border-Crossing

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5372763/5372764" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Bicycle riders crossing over from Tijuana to San Diego had to get off and walk Sunday after U.S. border officials closed an unofficial bike lane. The bike lane was created after the Sept. 11 terrorism attacks to ease bottlenecks at the world's busiest border crossing. U.S. officials say travelers abused the privilege when Mexican vendors began renting bikes to travelers trying to avoid the long wait to walk across. One said the crossing at times looked more like the Tour de France.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Bicycle riders crossing over from Tijuana to San Diego had to get off and walk yesterday after U.S. border officials closed an unofficial bike lane. The bike lane was created after the 9/11 to ease bottlenecks at the world's busiest border crossing. U.S. officials say travelers abused the privilege when Mexican vendors began renting bikes to travelers trying to avoid the long lines to walk across. One said it looked like the Tour de France.

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