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In Los Angeles, Fellow Immigrants Close Shop

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In Los Angeles, Fellow Immigrants Close Shop

Business

In Los Angeles, Fellow Immigrants Close Shop

In Los Angeles, Fellow Immigrants Close Shop

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5374786/5374787" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A store displays its closed sign Monday, next to a promotional poster for the "Marcha" in Spanish. Getty Images hide caption

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In Los Angeles, Koreatown merchants are closing their businesses and factories so thousands of workers can take part in the national immigrant boycott and march. Korean merchants employ between 30,000 and 50,000 mostly Latino workers.

By most accounts, the idea for a national boycott started in Los Angeles. And as marchers clogged many cities in the United States, many parts of Los Angeles were feeling the impact, from Koreatown to a huge section of downtown that is a major food supplier to the region.

Across the city, many stores, restaurants and work sites closed voluntarity, and customers stayed home as part of the economic boycott. Many Korean merchants say their Latino workers asked for the day off to go to demonstrations. Numerous immigrant employees and high school students didn't show up for work or school, but others said they didn't want to lose a day's pay.

But many of those who showed up for work Monday also planned on going to the rallies, either before or after their shifts.