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Barbaro Overpowers Big Kentucky Derby Field

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Barbaro Overpowers Big Kentucky Derby Field

Sports

Barbaro Overpowers Big Kentucky Derby Field

Barbaro Overpowers Big Kentucky Derby Field

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In the 132nd running of the Kentucky Derby, Barbaro ran away from a 20-horse field to win by more than six lengths. The impressive performance raises expectations for a potential Triple Crown run.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

In the 132nd running of the Kentucky Derby yesterday, the three-year-old Colt Barbaro took command to lead a field of 20 horses.

Unidentified Announcer: And down the front they come in the Kentucky Derby. And Barbaro is running away. It's Edgar (unintelligible), and Barbaro is going to win this Derby by six lengths.

HANSEN: Barbaro's victorious run for the roses at Churchill Downs added another crowning day to the life of trainer Michael Matz.

In 1989, Matz was aboard a plane that crashed in Iowa. He survived the crash and pulled three children to safety from the burning wreckage. And in 1996, Matz captured a silver medal at the Olympics as an equestrian.

Matz now takes Barbaro to Baltimore for the Preakness Stakes, the second jewel in horseracing's Triple Crown.

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