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Putin Accuses West of 'Outdated Prejudices'

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Putin Accuses West of 'Outdated Prejudices'

World

Putin Accuses West of 'Outdated Prejudices'

Putin Accuses West of 'Outdated Prejudices'

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Russian President Vladimir Putin takes a swipe at Western critics in his State of the Nation speech Wednesday, accusing them of hanging on to outdated prejudices.

His remarks seemed to be a response to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, who last week accused Russia of using its energy reserves as "tools of intimidation or blackmail."

Western analysts agree, saying Moscow is pursuing a grand strategy to ensure total control over supplies to Western and Asian markets. They say gas is Moscow's "new nuclear bomb" - and that the Kremlin sees Washington's attempts to break its grip on pipeline routes as a pretext for a new Cold War.