Pushing Art's Envelope at the Whitney Biennial

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'RWBs' by Liz Larner, a sculpture made from aluminum tubing, batting, fabric and ribbons i

In the foreground: RWBs by Liz Larner, a sculpture made from aluminum tubing, batting, fabric, ribbons, wire rope, padlocks and keys. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty Images
'RWBs' by Liz Larner, a sculpture made from aluminum tubing, batting, fabric and ribbons

In the foreground: RWBs by Liz Larner, a sculpture made from aluminum tubing, batting, fabric, ribbons, wire rope, padlocks and keys.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City is one of the art world's most significant events, featuring often politically charged works by more than 100 emerging and established talents known for their unconventional approach to their craft.

Rolling Stone writer Alex Mar says the Biennial is a magnet for debate about the nature of art.

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