Deluge Threatens New England Boarding School

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The school's flooded power plant on Monday morning. i

The school's flooded power plant on Monday morning. Kathy Baer hide caption

itoggle caption Kathy Baer
The school's flooded power plant on Monday morning.

The school's flooded power plant on Monday morning.

Kathy Baer
The Hargate building where, where officials feared the school's art collection might be lost. i

The Hargate Building, where officials feared the school's art collection might be lost. A brick path and road washed away, leaving water pouring into the front entrance. Kathy Baer hide caption

itoggle caption Kathy Baer
The Hargate building where, where officials feared the school's art collection might be lost.

The Hargate Building, where officials feared the school's art collection might be lost. A brick path and road washed away, leaving water pouring into the front entrance.

Kathy Baer
Floodwaters surround a bridge to a campus quad. i

Floodwaters surround a bridge to a campus quad. Kathy Baer hide caption

itoggle caption Kathy Baer
Floodwaters surround a bridge to a campus quad.

Floodwaters surround a bridge to a campus quad.

Kathy Baer

A massive effort is now under way to clean up damage from flooding across New England. The six-state region has been drenched with record-breaking rainfall over the last several days.

The economic impact from the flood damage will be in the tens of millions of dollars, and some schools and businesses remain closed. On Wednesday, Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (R) asked the federal government for disaster relief].

One of the states hardest hit is New Hampshire. Across the Granite state, 600 roads were closed during the height of the flooding. The governor called out 200 National Guard troops to help evacuate stranded residents.

Officials are keeping an eye on dams and bridges along the swollen Merrimack River. In Concord, N.H., the state capital, the Turkey River overflowed its banks.

Bill Matthews, headmaster of St. Paul's School in Concord, talks about how flooding in New England has swamped the campus and threatened to destroy the school's books and manuscripts.

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