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A Failed Levee in New Orleans: Part Two
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A Failed Levee in New Orleans: Part Two

Katrina & Beyond

A Failed Levee in New Orleans: Part Two

A Failed Levee in New Orleans: Part Two
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It ranks as one of the worst engineering disaters in history: the failure of the levee system to protect New Orleans from Hurricane Katrina. There have been no less than three investigations into why this happened, and as NPR's David kestenbaum reports, the picture that's emerging is that there was not one cause, but many.

One of the critical events was that a large chunk of the 17th St. canal wall broke away. This allowed Lake Ponchartrain to flow into downtown.

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