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Rocking a Conservative World

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Rocking a Conservative World

Rocking a Conservative World

Rocking a Conservative World

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Talk about your record labels: The National Review has assembled a list of the greatest "conservative" rock songs of all time. Is the Beach Boys' "Wouldn't It Be Nice" really an ode to abstinence?

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

What do the Who's Won't Get Fooled Again, Sympathy for the Devil by the Stones and Wouldn't It Be Nice by the Beach Boys have in common? They all appear on the National Review's list of Top 10 conservative rock songs of all time. Actually, the current issue of the conservative magazine names a total of 50 songs a Republican can dance to. John J. Miller, author of the article, pointed out to the New York Times that the Who's song, for example, ends with the cynical lyrics, Meet the new boss, same as the old boss, i.e., all revolutions fail. Wouldn't It Be Nice he characterizes as a pro-abstinence song. Other conservative faves include Sweet Home Alabama, Tax Man, even Bodies by the Sex Pistols, which the National Review says is an anti-abortion anthem. Looks like the next GOP fundraiser is going to rock.

(Soundbite of song "Won't Get Fooled Again")

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