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Haditha Casts Pall over a Marine Family's Grief

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Haditha Casts Pall over a Marine Family's Grief

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Haditha Casts Pall over a Marine Family's Grief

Haditha Casts Pall over a Marine Family's Grief

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5436826/5436848" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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George Terrazas, 15, and Andy Terrazas, 14, flank a picture of big brother Miguel (at center of framed photo). Both young men say they plan to enlist in the Marines. John Burnett, NPR hide caption

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John Burnett, NPR

George Terrazas, 15, and Andy Terrazas, 14, flank a picture of big brother Miguel (at center of framed photo). Both young men say they plan to enlist in the Marines.

John Burnett, NPR

The Naval Criminal Investigative Service is probing the alleged unprovoked killings of 24 civilians last November by U.S. Marines in the insurgent hotbed of Haditha, Iraq.

The dead include women and children. According to news accounts, the killings were in retaliation for the death of Marine Lance Cpl. Miguel Terrazas, Jr. He was 20 years old.

For more than fifty years, the Terrazas family has run a tiny store called Ben's Tacos, in the Segundo Barrio neighborhood of El Paso, Texas. On this Memorial Day, family members are struggling with the scandal that has overshadowed the death of Lance Cpl. Terrazas.