Al Gore Screens His Global Warming Message

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Here is an image of Florida today. i

Here is an image of Florida today. Courtesy of Rodale Press hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Rodale Press
Here is an image of Florida today.

Here is an image of Florida today.

Courtesy of Rodale Press
What Florida would look like if Greenland melted i

This is what Florida would look like if Greenland melted or broke up and slipped into the sea, or if half of Greenland and half of Antarctica melted or broke up and slipped into the sea. Sea levels worldwide would increase by between 18 and 20 feet. Courtesy of Rodale Press hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Rodale Press
What Florida would look like if Greenland melted

This is what Florida would look like if Greenland melted or broke up and slipped into the sea, or if half of Greenland and half of Antarctica melted or broke up and slipped into the sea. Sea levels worldwide would increase by between 18 and 20 feet.

Courtesy of Rodale Press

For 17 years, former Vice President Al Gore has been on the forefront of warning against global warming. But in his new documentary, The Inconvenient Truth, he says that he "failed to get the message out."

He's now getting the message out with his documentary and new book of the same name. The Washington Post calls the book "downright chilling." The documentary has been critically acclaimed.

Books Featured In This Story

An Inconvenient Truth

The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We Can Do About It

by Albert Gore

Paperback, 325 pages | purchase

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Title
An Inconvenient Truth
Subtitle
The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We Can Do About It
Author
Albert Gore

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