NPR logo

Portrait of French Countess Heads for Minneapolis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5447914/5448228" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Portrait of French Countess Heads for Minneapolis

Art & Design

Portrait of French Countess Heads for Minneapolis

Portrait of French Countess Heads for Minneapolis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5447914/5448228" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Comtesse d'Egmont Pignatelli i

Septimanie de Richelieu, daughter of the duc de Richelieu, married Casimir Pignatelli, the Comte d'Egmont, when she was 16 years old, becoming the Comtesse d'Egmont Pignatelli. Courtesy of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts
Comtesse d'Egmont Pignatelli

Septimanie de Richelieu, daughter of the duc de Richelieu, married Casimir Pignatelli, the Comte d'Egmont, when she was 16 years old, becoming the Comtesse d'Egmont Pignatelli.

Courtesy of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) has acquired a rare, and even more rarely seen, oil painting from the mid-18th century. The rococo portrait of Comtesse d'Egmont Pignatelli was completed in 1763 by Swedish-born painter Alexander Roslin. It is now on view at the institute's recently renovated galleries.

Known for her beauty and intelligence, the countess was a key figure in the court of King Louis XV.

Roslin, who settled in Paris in 1752, quickly established himself as a fashionable and technically skilled portraitist in the king's court.

Curator Patrick Noon talks about the significance of the acquisition, considered one of the masterpieces of 18th-century French portraiture. The painting has been on public view only four times in the last 250 years; the MIA acquired the painting from New York's Wildenstein & Co. Noon says the painting has already been requested for several exhibitions, including a major Roslin retrospective in Stockholm.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.