NPR logo

Walk Of The Locust May Help Predict A Swarm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5448748/5448753" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Walk Of The Locust May Help Predict A Swarm

Environment

Walk Of The Locust May Help Predict A Swarm

Walk Of The Locust May Help Predict A Swarm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5448748/5448753" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Locust swarms are known to stretch for miles. Gabriel A. Miller hide caption

toggle caption
Gabriel A. Miller

Locust swarms are known to stretch for miles.

Gabriel A. Miller

Farmers in West Africa and parts of Australia tend to panic when they hear the roar of a giant swarm of locusts. By the time a farmer hears a swarm, it's usually too late to do anything but wait for the plague to pass. At the moment, researchers have a hard time predicting the movements of locust swarms. But that may be changing, according to a study in the journal Science.