Miranda's Foundation, and Today's Rights Forty years ago today, The Supreme Court ruled in the case of Miranda v. Arizona. Since then, the Miranda rights have become deeply imbedded in the legal system -- and the culture of TV cop shows. Commentator Melissa Waters has been working with Iraqi judges and lawyers as they build a new legal system.
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Miranda's Foundation, and Today's Rights

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Miranda's Foundation, and Today's Rights

Miranda's Foundation, and Today's Rights

Miranda's Foundation, and Today's Rights

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Forty years ago today, The Supreme Court ruled in the case of Miranda v. Arizona. Since then, the Miranda rights have become deeply imbedded in the legal system — and the culture of TV cop shows. Commentator Melissa Waters, who teaches at Washington and Lee Law School, has been working with Iraqi judges and lawyers as they build a new legal system.

Waters says that the Miranda protocols seem strange to the Iraqis — but she also believes Americans would do well to engage with their own ever-evolving legal system as the Iraqis do.