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Miranda's Foundation, and Today's Rights

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Miranda's Foundation, and Today's Rights

Law

Miranda's Foundation, and Today's Rights

Miranda's Foundation, and Today's Rights

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5482949/5482950" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Forty years ago today, The Supreme Court ruled in the case of Miranda v. Arizona. Since then, the Miranda rights have become deeply imbedded in the legal system — and the culture of TV cop shows. Commentator Melissa Waters, who teaches at Washington and Lee Law School, has been working with Iraqi judges and lawyers as they build a new legal system.

Waters says that the Miranda protocols seem strange to the Iraqis — but she also believes Americans would do well to engage with their own ever-evolving legal system as the Iraqis do.