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'Sounds of Silence': Rocking Out in Iran

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'Sounds of Silence': Rocking Out in Iran

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'Sounds of Silence': Rocking Out in Iran

'Sounds of Silence': Rocking Out in Iran

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Culturally, the Western world sees Iran as cloaked in black robes and turbans, a nation repressed by conservative mullahs and ideologically pristine.

Behind the image is a stark reality — more than 65 percent of the nation's population is 25 years old or younger, and there is a youth culture eager to break free.

Music from 'Sounds of Silence'

Hear full-length music cuts from groups featured in the documentary:

'Darvish' by O-Hum

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'Madaama' by Barobax

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'Baxet Kojan' by Hich-Kas

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Filmmakers Amir Hamz and Mark Lazarz capture that restless spirit in a new documentary titled Sounds of Silence. The film profiles a generation of artists who are creating and distributing new music behind the back of the Islamic republic.

Unlike the traditional music approved by religious censors, these musicians choose to rock — and even rap — all the while, dodging the authorities.

And the music they create finds unlikely inspiration from the Koran and revered mystical poets and philosophers from Persia's golden age.

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