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Welfare Reform and Wyoming's Safety Net
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Welfare Reform and Wyoming's Safety Net

Low-Wage America

Welfare Reform and Wyoming's Safety Net

Welfare Reform and Wyoming's Safety Net
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A map of the northwestern U.S. highlights Wyoming in red letters.

From 1995 to 2005, the number of welfare recipients in Wyoming fell 97.3 percent. hide caption

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A decade after the Welfare Reform Act gave states grants to run their own anti-poverty programs, many states can cite much progress in moving people from welfare to the workforce. But as John Biewen of American RadioWorks and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University reports, leaders in Wyoming are debating how to strengthen the safety net for the working poor.

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