Rescuers Prepare for a Wild Whitewater Season

Even highly skilled rescue rangers gulp water i i

hide captionEven highly skilled rescue rangers gulp water and gasp for air during this training exercise.

Karl Kaku
Even highly skilled rescue rangers gulp water

Even highly skilled rescue rangers gulp water and gasp for air during this training exercise.

Karl Kaku
It was a record year for snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains i i

hide captionIt was a record year for snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and many California rivers are swelling with rushing water.

Sasha Khokha
It was a record year for snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains

It was a record year for snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and many California rivers are swelling with rushing water.

Sasha Khokha
National park rangers wear bright wetsuits and hard helmets to protect themselves i i

hide captionNational park rangers wear bright wetsuits and hard helmets to protect themselves during a training exercise.

Karl Kaku
National park rangers wear bright wetsuits and hard helmets to protect themselves

National park rangers wear bright wetsuits and hard helmets to protect themselves during a training exercise.

Karl Kaku

It was a record year for snow in many parts of the West — and as summer approaches, that snowpack is melting fast. That's good news for whitewater rafters, but it can be deadly for casual swimmers.

At least five people have already drowned this year in California's Sierra Nevada, home to some of the fastest uncontrolled rivers in the West. On a recent day in Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, about a dozen rangers dressed in thick wetsuits and brightly-colored helmets participated in rescue practice exercises.

Even these fit and highly trained rescue rangers are gulping water and gasping for air during some of the exercises. This, despite being dressed in wetsuits — better protection than an average tourist is likely to have. The 45-degree water usually saps people's strength in less than five minutes, says ranger Ned Kelleher.

"People underestimate the strength of the water and how cold the water is," Kelleher says.

This summer, volunteers will join trained rangers to patrol the riverbanks in this park. They will warn visitors to stay out of rivers until later in the season, when water levels are lower come down and it is safer to swim.

Sasha Khokha is a reporter with member station KQED in San Francisco.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: