Army Sergeant Still Missing in Iraq After Two Years

Army Sgt. Matt Maupin was captured two years ago while protecting a civilian convoy. His mother, Carolyn, is certain he'll return. His brother, Micah — a Marine — wants to go to Iraq to help find his brother.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

The U.S. military has recovered the bodies of two Americans who went missing last Friday. Friends and family of another American soldier are still waiting for news.

Army Sergeant Matt Maupin has been missing in Iraq for two years. He was captured while helping to protect a civilian convoy near Baghdad. The military categorizes Maupin as Missing in Action.

Ms. CAROLINE MAUPIN (Mother of Matt Maupin): I probably have emotions every day when I go to work. Some days I just can't wait to get home and release that by crying and praying, because they build up so much.

INSKEEP: That's Caroline Maupin. She's Matt's mother. She gets a call every Friday night at 6:00 from the U.S. military with an update on her son.

Ms. MAUPIN: People ask me, Caroline, do you think that they're doing all they can? And, of course, my answer always is do you see Matt here? And that isn't mean or anything, but you're doing all you can, I understand that, but I'd like to see Matt.

INSKEEP: Within days of Maupin's capture, kidnappers released a video of him surrounded by masked gunmen. Three months later, another video was released. It showed a soldier being shot, and then falling into a grave. But that footage did not show the soldier's face, and the body was never recovered.

Micah Maupin is Matt's brother.

Corporal MICAH MAUPIN (United States Marine Corps.; Brother of Matt Maupin): I wouldn't mind going over there and trying to help something, fix something, find something. But it's probably not likely that I would be one to actually be able to go over and help try to find him.

INSKEEP: Although it is possible that Micah Maupin could go to Iraq. He's 21 years old and a Marine corporal, stationed at Miramar, California with a unit that repairs helicopters. For now, he's recovering from injuries suffered in a motorcycle accident. But he and his parents have discussed the possibility that he would go overseas.

Cpl. MAUPIN: In my particular job, it shouldn't be that dangerous for me to go over there and come back. But, Iraq is Iraq to some people.

Ms. MAUPIN: Micah has volunteered to go over, I believe, twice. And his mother, myself, I ask him if he would please reconsider until we had some resolution on Matt. I know the second time I asked him, when he called, he said, I'm not going. And for me, that was good, but I could hear the sadness in his voice. And I asked him, I said, are you sad? And he really didn't answer me, but I knew he wanted to go over, because of Matt and because his other, fellow Marines had already been there and back. I tell you what, he wants to go over.

Cpl. MAUPIN: There's only so long I can stay back before I feel like I'm not doing my job. I mean, I can do as much as I can here, but I just don't feel like I'm doing as good as I could if I was in - as somewhere else.

INSKEEP: Those are family members of Army Sgt. Matt Maupin, who's been missing in Iraq for two years.

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