NPR logo

Alligator Scare Ends with Duct Tape

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5505864/5505865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Alligator Scare Ends with Duct Tape

Around the Nation

Alligator Scare Ends with Duct Tape

Alligator Scare Ends with Duct Tape

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5505864/5505865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

All those urban legends about alligators? Bobby Kish, of Pottstown, Pa., must be a believer by now. Kish was delivering the Pottstown Mercury when he stepped out of his truck to retrieve a badly thrown paper and, out from between two cars, hissing and snapping, came a 4-foot gator. Kish jumped in his truck and headed for the cop shop. Police subdued the reptile with, of course, duct tape. They booked the creature as Al. initial E. Gator. "Al" is awaiting transfer.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

All those urban legends about alligators? Bobby Kish, of Pottstown, PA, must be a believer. Mr. Kish was delivering the Pottstown Mercury. He stepped out of his truck to retrieve a paper, and out from between two cars, hissing and snapping, came a four-foot gator. Kish jumped in his truck and headed for the cop shop. Police subdued the reptile with, of course, duct tape. They booked the creature as Al, initial E, Gator. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.