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A Noah's Ark for Earth's Seeds

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A Noah's Ark for Earth's Seeds

Science

A Noah's Ark for Earth's Seeds

A Noah's Ark for Earth's Seeds

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Cary Fowler is the executive director of the Global Crop Diversity Trust, based in Rome. Dan Charles, NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles, NPR

Norway has launched a unique construction project on the remote Norwegian island of Svalbard, halfway between the Arctic Circle and the North Pole. It's an underground vault for agricultural seeds, a kind of Noah's Ark for millions of varieties of wheat, rice, and hundreds of other crops that farmers no longer plant in their fields.

For a soft-spoken man from western Tennessee named Cary Fowler, it's the culmination of a lifelong — and controversial — campaign.

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