Engineering Gems of the U.S. Highway System

A rendering of the Veterans' Glass Skyway outside Toledo, Ohio. i

A rendering of the Veterans' Glass Skyway outside Toledo, Ohio. Figg Engineering Group hide caption

itoggle caption Figg Engineering Group
A rendering of the Veterans' Glass Skyway outside Toledo, Ohio.

A rendering of the Veterans' Glass Skyway outside Toledo, Ohio.

Figg Engineering Group
The I-10 deck tunnel in Phoenix. i

The I-10 deck tunnel in Phoenix. Arizona Department of Transportation hide caption

itoggle caption Arizona Department of Transportation
The I-10 deck tunnel in Phoenix.

The I-10 deck tunnel in Phoenix.

Arizona Department of Transportation

The U.S. interstate highway system is celebrating its 50th anniversary. Fifty years ago, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a bill to pay for the wide ribbons of highways that connect America's cities and towns.

The system of highways profoundly changed American society: where we live, how we live and how much we depend on our cars.

In honor of this milestone, Melissa Block and Michele Norris talk to three civil engineers about their favorite part of the system.

Utah engineer Tom Warne cites the I-10 deck tunnels in Phoenix — a series of bridges and tunnels that preserved two historic neighborhoods and provided park space for residents.

Linda Pierce of the Washington State Department of Transportation says she thinks the most impressive part of the U.S. highway system is the pavement — in her home state.

And Mike Gramza of the Ohio Department of Transportation singles out the Veterans' Glass City Skyway outside Toledo.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.