News Agenda from the Friday Editors' Meeting

So far, it's a light day on the hard news front. Most of official Washington has already headed out of town for a long weekend, or week, in honor of the Fourth of July. Don't expect anything out of the Supreme Court, which ended it session yesterday, or Congress. The biggest thing on President Bush's schedule is a trip to Graceland in Tennessee with Japanese Prime Minister and Elvis fan Junichiro Koizumi.

But if you're gearing up for the Tour de France, which starts on Saturday, All Things Considered and Day to Day are both working on stories to try to bring you up to date on the latest doping scandal out of Spain.

If you’re more interested in the shuttle launch, Day to Day is planning to air what should be a colorful story from David Kestenbaum about what NASA's doing to keep vultures from getting in the way. But the scuttlebutt is there's only a 40 percent chance the launch will happen Saturday afternoon anyway, because storms are expected to keep it on Earth.

You’ll want to listen for David Folkenflik's piece on the ongoing brouhaha over the media's coverage of issues the Bush administration had hoped to keep hush-hush. He’ll talk about USA Today's note to its readers today that it can no longer confirm that "BellSouth or Verizon contracted with the (National Security Agency) to provide bulk calling records" for the database the agency compiled. He'll also talk about the heat reporters from other newspapers are getting from the federal government for disclosing government secrets in the war on terrorism.

News and Notes will delve into the topic of what parents and government can do about Internet predators. The show will talk to Rep. Diana DeGette (D-CO) about her efforts to combat the problem.

If you heard Steve Inskeep's story this morning on Jerry Falwell and were intrigued by the fact that the conservative preacher had a gay ghost writer for his autobiography, npr.org has more on that.

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