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U.S. Begins to Replace Aging Nuclear Weapons

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U.S. Begins to Replace Aging Nuclear Weapons

U.S.

U.S. Begins to Replace Aging Nuclear Weapons

U.S. Begins to Replace Aging Nuclear Weapons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5541420/5541421" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile is aging and, according to the government, the older weapons are ready to be retired. New weapons are in the planning stages, but bans on certain forms of weapons testing leave weapons scientists with a challenge: is it possible to build a nuclear bomb and be so certain it will work that physical tests will never be necessary? Guests discuss the next generation of nuclear weapons.

Guests:

Geoff Brumfiel, physical sciences correspondent; Nature magazine

Robert W. Nelson, senior scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists, visiting member of the research staff, Program on Science and Global Security at Princeton University

Ambassador C. Paul Robinson, chief negotiator and head of the U.S. delegation to the U.S./U.S.S.R. nuclear testing talks in Geneva; former director of Sandia National Laboratories