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Refreshingly Old School: Pimms Cup

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Refreshingly Old School: Pimms Cup

Food

Refreshingly Old School: Pimms Cup

Refreshingly Old School: Pimms Cup

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5541978/5541979" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cause or Effect? Pimms Cup is linked to warm-weather activities, from Wimbledon to horse racing. hide caption

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Recipe: Pimms Cup

  • Fill a Collins glass with ice.
  • Mix 1 part Pimms Cup No. 1 with 2 parts lemonade.
  • Stir or shake.
  • Top off with club soda, or use lemon-lime soda for a sweeter drink.
  • Stir lightly -- but do NOT shake again.
  • Garnish with a slice of Kirby cucumber; lemon wedge optional.

Options

  • If no lemonade is at hand, use Sprite or 7-Up.
  • To make with ginger ale, use plenty of lemons.
  • Mint, apple and orange can be added.
  • For the coup de grace, use borage leaves.

With Wimbledon wrapping up this weekend we take a look at the beverage most associated with the event: the Pimms Cup. Michele Norris speaks with Martin Joyce, director of catering for Wimbledon, about what's in the drink — and why it pairs so well with watching tennis.

Since its beginnings in the middle of the 19th century, Pimms has remained a British hot-weather favorite. With flavors that recall gin and a color like that of iced tea, Pimms is a natural thirst-quencher. And at only 50 proof, it's a bit safer to quaff courtside, where decorum counts.

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