NPR logo

Shuttle Astronauts Do Back-Flip to Get to Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5542002/5542003" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Shuttle Astronauts Do Back-Flip to Get to Work

Space

Shuttle Astronauts Do Back-Flip to Get to Work

Shuttle Astronauts Do Back-Flip to Get to Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5542002/5542003" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Discovery's crew cabin is photographed from the International Space Station prior to docking. Click for a glimpse of the astronauts. NASA hide caption

toggle caption NASA

The Discovery's crew cabin is photographed from the International Space Station prior to docking.

NASA

On Discovery's flight deck, shuttle commander Steven W. Lindsey preps for another day's work. NASA hide caption

toggle caption NASA

The astronauts of the shuttle Discovery spent the third day of their mission moving tons of cargo into the International Space Station. They docked at the station after putting the shuttle through a back-flip. But the astronauts say they first had to overcome a snag: a bad thermostat on a thruster.

Shuttle pilot Mark Kelly and shuttle commander Steve Lindsey say the problem was a tricky one, as they had to ensure that the thruster wouldn't be too cold for accurate control.

NPR's Robert Siegel spoke with astronauts Stephen Lindsey and Mark Kelly from the International Space Station — orbiting some 200 miles above Earth. In the short time of the conversation, the station passed over Italy, Romania, Ukraine and into southwestern Russia.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.