NPR News Agenda from the Thursday Editors' Meeting

The fighting between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon has escalated: there's a naval blockade of the Lebanese ports underway, Israel has bombed Beirut's airport and Hezbollah has fired rockets into Israel. It's item number one on tonight's programming. We'll have reporters on the scene and commentator Ted Koppel will weigh in as well.

In Washington, congressional hearings continue on just what the White House plans to do to conform to the Supreme Court's ruling that the Geneva Conventions apply to detainees captured in the war on terror. NPR has been working this story hard, in part because the explanations from the White House have been somewhat... vague. NPR's David Greene will try to make them less so.

Science Correspondent Nell Boyce will report on a privately funded space station effort. Yes, an alt-station in orbit that one can visit. Nell reports that it's inflatable. The science desk will also fill in details on the government's approval of a single pill for daily treatment of HIV infection, a vast improvement over the handful of pills once thought to be such a miracle. That will be on Day to Day, where you also will hear about a story from the writers at Slate about al-Qaida and why they have it out for the Rotary Club.

On All Things Considered, listen for a conversation with a former teammate of cycling giant Lance Armstrong about the Tour de France this year... and the latest on claims that Armstrong used illegal drugs to improve his incomparable performances in six previous Tours.

Lastly, NPR bids adieu to our Canadian ombudsman, Jeffrey Dvorkin. As ombudsman, Jeffrey listened to you and listened to us and then weighed the lot of us in the balance of public service and good journalism. "It wasn't easy," Jeffrey said with a northern touch of understatement. "Herding cats" is one way he's described the job. Jeffrey goes on to teach and promises he'll keep listening. He will be missed, as will his most fabulous neckties.

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