Questions Raised over New Treatments and Consent The Food and Drug Administration debates the testing of experimental blood in trauma patients who can't always give their consent. Also, a new report by the Institute of Medicine says research conducted using prisoners needs more oversight.
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Questions Raised over New Treatments and Consent

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Questions Raised over New Treatments and Consent

Questions Raised over New Treatments and Consent

Questions Raised over New Treatments and Consent

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The Food and Drug Administration debates the testing of experimental blood in trauma patients who can't always give their consent. Also, a new report by the Institute of Medicine says research conducted using prisoners needs more oversight.

Mary Faith Marshall, associate dean for social medicine and medical humanities; professor of family medicine and community health; professor, center for bioethics, University of Minnesota Medical School

Roger Lewis, professor of medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; director of research Department of Emergency Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center

Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., professor of public health, Johns Hopkins University; professor of law and director, Center on Law and the Public Health, Georgetown University