NPR logo

Fact and Fiction Overlap in Weber's 'Triangle'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5560321/5560351" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Fact and Fiction Overlap in Weber's 'Triangle'

Books

Fact and Fiction Overlap in Weber's 'Triangle'

Fact and Fiction Overlap in Weber's 'Triangle'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5560321/5560351" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Katharine Weber

Katharine Weber has family ties to the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. hide caption

toggle caption

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire on March 25, 1911, stunned New York. Many of the 146 people who died in the fire jumped from upper floors, where fire-department ladders couldn't reach and fire escapes melted in the heat.

That fire provides the background for Katharine Weber's new novel Triangle. Her grandmother actually worked at the factory, two years before the disaster.

Protagonist Esther Gottesfeld (who takes her surname from Weber's grandmother) is the fictional last survivor of the blaze. For years, she's told her version of what happened. But a pushy academic, Ruth Zion, raises questions about the facts in Esther's story.

The book is fiction, but Weber is after the truth. She talks with Sheilah Kast about her book.

Excerpt: 'Triangle'

Cover of 'Triangle' shows a thread on a shirt beginning to unravel

A professor seeks to unravel the truth about an oft-told tale in Katharine Weber's novel. Farrar, Straus and Giroux hide caption

toggle caption Farrar, Straus and Giroux

It was payday that day, it was a Saturday, and the pay envelopes had just been handed out, and before that for a few minutes there was a break and my friend Ida Brodsky, she died, she was a wonderful friend to me, she made a cake for a surprise because of my engagement to Sam, because we had just said a few days before we would get married, we didn't even get a ring yet, and people were happy for us, all the girls working together, it was so cheerful sometimes even with the hard work.

I had my pay envelope and my sister's also, to keep for her, we each got maybe six or eight dollars or sometimes less, except in a good week, and once we each made twelve dollars for a week's work but that was an exception, but you could live on that money we made and send some home, too. We thought we were doing well, we were happy enough with what we had, even though the unions told us to get more and told us we shouldn't be so happy, and they were right, but we were never hungry, we were so young and healthy and strong, and it felt like a chance to get ahead, so we didn’t mind the long days and the terrible loud noise of the machines and the smell of the oil everywhere.

That oil, they had to use it, to keep the machines going, but they could have opened those dirty windows for even a breath of fresh air, it wouldn't have made us work slower and who knows it might have made us work better, but all the windows were always kept closed tight — and I remember I just took a moment from my machine to tuck the pay packets for both of us into my stocking to be safe like always, I took them both from our boss, Mr. Jacobs, so my sister could keep working for every minute left — and the next day would have been our one day off in the week, so we were looking forward to that — and then there was a big noise behind me, while I was still bending down, like nothing I had ever heard, and I thought, What could that be?

So loud, like an explosion and something breaking all at once! So I turned around, and my sister next to me, she turned around too, and what did we see? Flames! They were just outside the window on the Greene Street side, they were right there behind me. The flames were coming up from the eighth floor but we didn't know everybody on the eighth floor was already in a commotion and escaping because that's where the fire started, and a lot of those girls got out before that big noise which was the windows breaking from the fire, mostly they got out from the eighth floor, but we were on the ninth floor, that's where I worked already for a year with my sister, we learned English so fast and we had these good jobs and our life in America was a big adventure for us.

We thought it was fortunate to work on the ninth floor where the bosses gave a little more pay and the really skilled girls, the fastest workers, they had their machines. Maybe that was never true and it was the same on the eighth floor but this is what we thought. Nobody on our floor knew what was happening right underneath us until those windows blew out. More people could have got out if we knew, but nobody told us. They knew on the tenth floor and they all got out, but one. A lot of people below us and everyone above us got out. Only on the ninth floor it was unlucky to be, because nobody told us.

Related NPR Stories

Web Resources

Books Featured In This Story

Triangle

by Katharine Weber

Hardcover, 242 pages |

purchase

Buy Featured Book

Title
Triangle
Author
Katharine Weber

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.