NPR logo

What's Left Behind on the Journey North

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5562843/5562844" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
What's Left Behind on the Journey North

Commentary

What's Left Behind on the Journey North

What's Left Behind on the Journey North

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5562843/5562844" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At 4 years old, Esperanza Mendez' parents headed north to America, leaving her with a grandmother in a small village in Mexico. She was reunited with her parents six years later in Los Angeles. Mendez, now an undocumented teenager living in Los Angeles, recounts her immigration story.

Mendez' essay is part of Entering New Territory: Dreams for a New Los Angeles — a collection of essays from students at the Humanitas Academy at Roosevelt High School in Boyle Heights, a predominantly Latino neighborhood in East Los Angeles.

Books Featured In This Story

Entering New Territory

Dreams for a New Los Angeles

by Students of Theodore Roosevelt High Scho and Antonio Villaraigosa

Paperback, 175 pages |

purchase

Buy Featured Book

Title
Entering New Territory
Subtitle
Dreams for a New Los Angeles
Author
Students of Theodore Roosevelt High Scho and Antonio Villaraigosa

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.