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Book Marketing Goes to the Movies

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Book Marketing Goes to the Movies

Business

Book Marketing Goes to the Movies

Book Marketing Goes to the Movies

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Authors and publishers are always looking for ways to make their books stand out from the crowd. Now, companies are producing trailers for books — like movie previews, but for literature.

JOHN YDSTIE, Host:

Promoting books usually involves print advertising and touring authors. There's a move now to attract readers using a different medium. Publishing houses, including HarperCollins, are trying out book trailers. Think movie trailers but for literature. Some of these ads are web-only and use excerpts of a book paired with flash animation. Others are made for the big screen.

(SOUNDBITE OF BOOK ADVERTISEMENT)

YDSTIE: Genevieve Wallace is searching for the treasure of the Marie Josephine and the 19th century pirate cache that reputedly went down with her. Genevieve is about to find something far more sinister.

YDSTIE: That's a trailer for The Vision, by Heather Graham. It's made by a company called Circle of Seven. It specializes in live-action book trailers that air in theaters. CEO Sheila English says her firm strategically places book trailers in specific theaters.

SHEILA ENGLISH: We do choose the movie theaters carefully. We want to make sure that it's in a location near a bookstore.

YDSTIE: So after the show, moviegoers could hop over to the store and buy the book if the trailer has piqued their interest. English says her trailers remind people that just like movies, TV and video games, books are entertainment too.

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