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Sago Inquiry: All That Could Go Wrong, Did

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Sago Inquiry: All That Could Go Wrong, Did

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Sago Inquiry: All That Could Go Wrong, Did

Sago Inquiry: All That Could Go Wrong, Did

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5568618/5568619" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The investigator of this year's disaster at the Sago coal mine in West Virginia issues a preliminary report that narrows the possible causes of the explosion. Still, the report states that, after the explosion, "everything that could go wrong, did go wrong."

Twelve miners died — one in the explosion itself, 11 others because they were trapped; rescuers did not reach them before they succumbed to carbon monoxide. Of the miners who were trapped, only one survived. Melissa Block talks with Davitt McAteer, who was appointed by West Virginia's governor to head the investigation.

Read the Report

The special investigator's report concluded that "everything that could go wrong, did go wrong" at the Sago coal mine in West Virginia, where 12 miners died. Read the report: