Special Bond: Identical and Simpatico

Janice Morris, left, and Caroline Satchell  visited a mobile StoryCorps booth in Washington, D.C. i i

Janice Morris, left, and Caroline Satchell visited a mobile StoryCorps booth in Washington, D.C. StoryCorps hide caption

itoggle caption StoryCorps
Janice Morris, left, and Caroline Satchell  visited a mobile StoryCorps booth in Washington, D.C.

Janice Morris, left, and Caroline Satchell visited a mobile StoryCorps booth in Washington, D.C.

StoryCorps

Mobile booths are currently in Ames, Iowa and Watertown, New York.

When they were kids, identical twins Janice Morris and Caroline Satchell sometimes felt a little shortchanged. Nobody could tell them apart — not their teachers, not even their friends.

As a result, Caroline says, "our childhoods were identical." Both have the memory of being so similar that they couldn't be anyone's best friend because it would mean choosing one over the other.

Today, the two say, they can't imagine life without each other. They are "simpatico," and they know how lucky they are to have such a powerful, nourishing bond.

But one thing still bugs them: twin questions.

For the record, they don't feel each other's pain. They don't have ESP or a secret language. And they never, ever, switched dates.

"I guess there are twins who do that," Janice says. "But not any self-respecting twins."

This story was produced for 'Morning Edition' by Katie Simon.

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