Muggy Weather Makes for Good Froggin'

Hot weather tends to put a lot of activities on hold. But it is especially good for bullfrogging. Robert Siegel talks with Willie Lyles, a retired outdoor skills specialist with the Missouri Department of Conservation, about this night-time sport. He also finds out why Lyles prefers to go "mano-a-mano" with the slippery critters.

Recipe: Finley's Frog Fry

A recipe for fried bullfrog from Jeff Finley. Reprinted by permission of the Missouri Department of Conservation:

1 cup flour

1 cup crushed saltine crackers

1/4 cup corn starch

1 tbs black pepper

1 tbs season salt

1 tbs lemon pepper salt

2 eggs

1 cup milk

2 quarts peanut oil

Thaw a possession limit of frog legs (16 pair) drain and pat dry with paper towels. Heat oil to 375 degrees. Combine dry ingredients into a large plastic bowl with lid. Dip legs into milk and egg mixture then drop into bowl with dry ingredients. Cover bowl and shake your legs! Drop in hot oil and cook until golden brown.

The experience and excitement of hunting frogs is topped only by the satisfaction of eating your harvest, and nothing draws kinfolk out of the woodwork like frogs in hot fat. All that usually remains after a frog fry is a little pile of bones picked clean as cotton swabs. This summer, hunt some frogs with your friends and family, make some lasting memories and enjoy a taste of Missouri's bountiful resources.

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