Israeli Warplanes Pound Targets in Lebanon

Friday map i i

hide captionSome 20 people were wounded in northern Israel Thursday by Hezbollah rockets. Meanwhile, Syrian and Iranian officials meet to discuss to current conflict. Click enlarge for more detail.

Jeremy Vanderknyff, NPR
Friday map

Some 20 people were wounded in northern Israel Thursday by Hezbollah rockets. Meanwhile, Syrian and Iranian officials meet to discuss to current conflict. Click enlarge for more detail.

Jeremy Vanderknyff, NPR

United Nations observers in south Lebanon said there was a lull Friday in the fierce ground battles that have been taking place between Israeli soldiers and Hezbollah guerillas near the villages of Bint Jbail and Maroun al-Ras.

But Israeli warplanes continue to pound suspected Hezbollah bases in the border region, and throughout Lebanon. In the last 24 hours, Hezbollah has fired more than 100 rockets into northern Israel, wounding at least 20.

Israeli warplanes hit more than 125 targets in Lebanon over the last day in an effort to knock out Hezbollah communications, and prevent weapons from moving into the south of the country.

Eastern parts of the Bekaa Valley, a Hezbollah stronghold, were pounded late Thursday and early Friday, taking out buildings and suspected storage sites for long-range missiles. A Lebanese army base and several radio masts in the north of the country were also hit.

Three truck drivers were killed as Israel continued to target vehicles it suspected of trying to shuttle weapons into the south, especially vehicles coming in from the Syrian border. Lebanon's truck drivers association said that more than 450 trucks have been destroyed since the fighting began on July 12. The association said the transport trucks have been trying to move food and relief supplies around the country.

The Lebanese government is negotiating with the U.N. to secure a humanitarian corridors for the delivery of supplies to the civilian population.

One aid convoy was able to reach several villages in south Lebanon that have come under heavy bombardment for more than two weeks. A spokesman with the International Committee of the Red Cross said aid teams found families hiding in mosques, schools and churches. Some said they were too afraid to move, while others think they can ride out the worst of the storm.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: