NPR logo

'No Child' Law Hits Inner-City Schools Hard

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5612375/5612376" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
'No Child' Law Hits Inner-City Schools Hard

Education

'No Child' Law Hits Inner-City Schools Hard

'No Child' Law Hits Inner-City Schools Hard

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5612375/5612376" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Not one of the 50 states has met the "quality" teacher standard established by the federal government's No Child Left Behind Act. America's inner-city classrooms have been some of the hardest hit by the law's penalties for not meeting standards.

Ed Gordon speaks with Michael Rebell, a professor at Columbia University's Teachers College and executive director of The Campaign for Educational Equity.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.