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Video Games Gain in Reality. But Fantasy Counts

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Video Games Gain in Reality. But Fantasy Counts

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Video Games Gain in Reality. But Fantasy Counts

Video Games Gain in Reality. But Fantasy Counts

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5614076/5614077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Recently, a new computer chip called the PhysX was unveiled. It's for video games, and it was designed to make them feel more realistic because it helps the objects you see on the screen follow the laws of real-world physics.

AGEIA, the company that makes the PhysX chip, promises things like explosions that cause dust and collateral debris, cloth that drapes and tears the way you expect it to, and dense smoke that billows around objects in motion. In other words, your video game will look even more real.

The new advances probably sound great to a lot of gamers — but not to commentator Jake Halpern.

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