Tangled Web for Williams in 'Night Listener'

Robin Williams, left, with Bobby Cannavale in The Night Listener

hide captionRobin Williams, left, with Bobby Cannavale in The Night Listener.

Miramax Films

Blurring the line between real life and fiction is a favorite tool of entertainment these days. Reality TV shows often manipulate reality, confessional memoirs sometimes feature confessions that aren't real. Now, a movie called The Night Listener adds a new wrinkle. It's about a radio show based on a memoir — and the film itself is based on a novel that was based on a real event. That's just the start of the complications.

Gabriel Noone is a radio storyteller. Since he's played by motormouth Robin Williams, you hardly expect him to be at a loss for words. But when we meet him, Gabriel is fresh out of stories. For years, he has used own life, and that of his lover, to weave first-person tales for his radio show. That they're both HIV-positive has made them especially poignant for listeners, but now Gabriel's lover is leaving him, bringing their story to an end, which may be why Gabriel gets so wrapped-up in an unpublished manuscript that a friend shows him. It, too, is a first-person narrative — the harrowing autobiography of a 14-year-old named Pete, who is also HIV-positive, and dying, after years of abuse.

Now in foster care, Pete turns out to be a fan of Gabriel's and soon the radio personality is having long chats with the boy on the phone, and also with his protective foster mom, Donna (Toni Collette). But something doesn't quite feel right. Donna and Pete sound a lot alike, and Gabriel starts to suspect he's being scammed. The suspicion grows stronger when he pays them an unannounced visit and Donna refuses to let Gabriel see the boy.

Which of course, leaves things inconclusive. Does Pete exist? And how can Gabriel be sure one way or the other? The situation parallels a real-life scenario that led novelist Armistead Maupin to write The Night Listener. Questions of authenticity have plagued other journalists — from reporters at major newspapers to staffers on Oprah. And the fact that some of the memoir-writers involved have confessed to things they haven't actually done adds a certain edge to what director Patrick Stettner puts on screen. But it also complicates his task.

To keep us guessing, Stettner has to keep us in the dark about the characters, and because we don't get to know them, it's hard to care much whether they're telling the truth. The performers are fine, but they're hamstrung, and to compensate, the director lays on the atmosphere. But the pace is solemn, and the story starts to flatten out at about the moment you want it to be building to a big finish. The Night Listener is not, in short, a story likely to keep you up nights.

Toni Collette Explores Darker Side in 'Night Listener'

Night Listener i i

hide captionIn the dark, psychological drama The Night Listener, Toni Collette portrays Donna Logand, a manipulative, blind woman who is caring for a teenage boy.

Anne Joyce/Miramax Films
Night Listener

In the dark, psychological drama The Night Listener, Toni Collette portrays Donna Logand, a manipulative, blind woman who is caring for a teenage boy.

Anne Joyce/Miramax Films
Little Miss Sunshine i i

hide captionIn the independent comedy Little Miss Sunshine, Collette plays Sheryl Hoover, the comparatively normal matriarch of a dysfunctional family.

Eric Lee/Fox Searchlights Films
Little Miss Sunshine

In the independent comedy Little Miss Sunshine, Collette plays Sheryl Hoover, the comparatively normal matriarch of a dysfunctional family.

Eric Lee/Fox Searchlights Films
 

It's a big summer for Australian actress Toni Collette: She has two new films, in which she plays two very different mothers.

In the zany comedy Little Miss Sunshine, Collette plays the harried but supremely practical and good-natured matriarch of the dysfunctional Hoover family. The film follows the family during a madcap road trip to their daughter's beauty pageant.

Fractured family is also at the center of Collette's other summer film. In The Night Listener, a movie in which people are rarely who or what they seem, Collete explores the spooky side of the maternal instinct.

Collette's character, Donna Logand, pursues a friendship over the phone with a popular New York radio host, played by Robin Williams. The two share a fondness for Donna's adopted teenage son (Rory Culkin), a street-smart boy with AIDS and a horrifying history of sexual abuse. Soon, Donna's story and her motives start to seem suspicious and, perhaps, pathological.

The Australian actress talks about how she's drawn to characters when she can identify with their emotional states, including the manipulative Donna.

"I used to do things to get attention, as most actors do," Collette says, recalling an incident when she was 11 and pretended to have appendicitis — to the point where doctors removed it.

"And this is the kind of thing that my character does," Collette says. "I think she had a really tough upbringing, and I think everyone deserves love and she didn't get it, and she goes out of her way to get it."

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: