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Firing Up the Coal for a Colorado Getaway

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Firing Up the Coal for a Colorado Getaway

Firing Up the Coal for a Colorado Getaway

Firing Up the Coal for a Colorado Getaway

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5626704/5626705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The coal-fired train chugs from Silverton to Durango. It takes about three-and-a-half hours to go 45 miles through a fairly remote part of the San Juan mountains. Adam Burke hide caption

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Adam Burke

The coal-fired train chugs from Silverton to Durango. It takes about three-and-a-half hours to go 45 miles through a fairly remote part of the San Juan mountains.

Adam Burke

The Day to Day summer travel series continues with another trip — this time, however, using a very different kind of fossil fuel.

Adam Burke skips the gasoline and hops on a narrow-gauge, coal-powered train into an isolated canyon near Durango, Colo.