After Terrorism Scare, Airport Screeners on High Alert In airports across the country today, would-be passengers chugged bottled water and tossed toothpaste, lotion and soap in the trash. The federal government says items like these -- and other liquids and gels -- could be used to sneak explosives onto planes, and banned them from carry-on luggage. As security checkpoints crack down, what are they looking for?
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After Terrorism Scare, Airport Screeners on High Alert

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After Terrorism Scare, Airport Screeners on High Alert

After Terrorism Scare, Airport Screeners on High Alert

After Terrorism Scare, Airport Screeners on High Alert

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5635330/5635331" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In airports across the country today, would-be passengers chugged bottled water and tossed toothpaste, lotion and soap in the trash. The federal government says items like these — and other liquids and gels — could be used to sneak explosives onto planes, and banned them from carry-on luggage. As security checkpoints crack down, what are they looking for?

Guest:

Paul Wilkinson, professor of international relations, chairman of the Center for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence at the University of St. Andrews, in Scotland