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U.S. Warns of Possible Terror Attacks in India

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U.S. Warns of Possible Terror Attacks in India

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U.S. Warns of Possible Terror Attacks in India

U.S. Warns of Possible Terror Attacks in India

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The U.S. Embassy warns U.S. citizens of possible terror attacks in New Delhi and Mumbai in the coming days. An e-mail from the embassy said that the attacks were believed to be planned around India's Independence Day, which falls on Aug. 15, and could be linked to al-Qaida.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

There is a new terror warning today for Americans living in India. The U.S. embassy in New Delhi is warning that foreign terrorists, possibly including al-Qaida members, may carry out a series of bombings in India's two major cities - New Delhi and Mumbai. The warning was sent by e-mail to American citizens. It said the attacks could happen on or around India's Independence Day celebrations next Tuesday. American Erin Baker lives in New Delhi, where she's a reporter for Time magazine. She says Indian security officials have been issuing warnings of possible attacks for some time and have taken some precautions.

Ms. ERIN BAKER (Reporter, Time Magazine): A lot the monuments is closed, like the Red Fort in New Delhi, which is quite a popular tourist destination, was closed; India Gateway, it's closed as well. Security cordons all around. Airlines are much more vigilant in checking all of your bags. And everybody's just sort of warning to keep an eye out for suspicious bags.

MONTAGNE: American Erin Baker living in New Delhi. The warning by the American Embassy said potential targets also include key government offices and gathering places, such as markets and hotels. The e-mail urged Americans to keep a low profile and be, quote, alert and attentive to their surroundings.

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