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Sept. 11 Tapes: Sounds of Chaos, Horror and Valor

Melissa Doi

Melissa Doi's Last Minutes

Melissa Doi, 32, died while trapped on the 83rd floor of the World Trade Center during the Sept. 11 attacks. Part of her 911 call was played for jurors in the Zacarias Moussaoui trial in April.

Hear the first four minutes of Doi's call to 911.
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Sept. 11 Tapes: Sounds of Chaos, Horror and Valor
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Emergency Responders

More than 1,600 emergency calls made during the horror and chaos of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11 were made public Wednesday. Most were calls to and from emergency responders. Excerpts are below:

Fire Chief Dennis Devlin requests help as cell phone networks failed. He died in the attacks.
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'One of the towers just collapsed,' a caller who identifies himself as Lt. Brown exclaims.
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EMS dispatchers take calls from workers at the scene who complained they weren't receiving enough instructions.
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The Sept. 11 recordings released Wednesday included frantic calls from people trapped on the upper floors of the World Trade Center, and calls to and from emergency responders.

The calls provide a glimpse into the horror and chaos — and the sense of duty — that followed after hijacked planes rammed into the World Trade Center.

"We're in a state of confusion," said Chief Dennis Devlin of Battalion 9, standing inside a command post at the World Trade Center as the twin towers burned above. "We have no cell phone service anywhere because of the disaster. ... Bring all the additional handy talkies."

Devlin was one of 19 firefighters who died that day whose voices can be heard on the previously undisclosed emergency calls.

Only the voices of emergency responders can be heard on the newly released recordings; the voices of civilian callers were removed from the tapes, as ordered by a court on privacy grounds.

The one exception is a call made by Melissa Doi, a 32-year-old manager at IQ Financial Systems who was trapped on the 83rd floor of the south tower.

The first four minutes of the call, with Doi's end of the conversation, were introduced as evidence in April in the terrorism trial of Zacarias Moussaoui. A 911 operator can be heard trying to reassure a panicky Doi.

On the recording, Doi says that she and the five others around her are having trouble breathing through the smoke and may soon run out of fresh air.

"I'm gonna die, aren't I?" Doi asks the operator.

An edited version of the rest of the call, about 31 minutes long, was released Thursday. Only the operator can be heard as she tries to console Doi, who apparently died while on the phone.

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