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Space Shuttle Tests: Whole Lotta Quaking

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Space Shuttle Tests: Whole Lotta Quaking

Space Shuttle Tests: Whole Lotta Quaking

Space Shuttle Tests: Whole Lotta Quaking

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5671711/5671712" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The 1,000th shuttle engine test at Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., took place Aug. 17, 2006. NASA hide caption

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The 1,000th shuttle engine test at Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, Miss., took place Aug. 17, 2006.

NASA

When space shuttle rocket engines are tested a mile from listener Stephan Howden's office in Mississippi, strangers think it's an earthquake. Howden says it's like a train going nearby.

We hear that sound, and then Robert Siegel talks to NASA Deputy Director David Throckmorton about why NASA tests its rockets so often.

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