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Study Cites Danger of Carrying Extra Weight

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Study Cites Danger of Carrying Extra Weight

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Study Cites Danger of Carrying Extra Weight

Study Cites Danger of Carrying Extra Weight

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A study from the National Cancer Institute finds that 50-year-olds who are even a little overweight have a greater chance of dying prematurely. And the heavier you are, the greater the risk. The study was published by the New England Journal of Medicine.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Here's some heavy news, for those in the neighborhood of 50. A study from the National Cancer Institute finds that 50 year olds who are even a little overweight have a greater chance to die prematurely. And the heavier you are, the greater the risk. The study was published by the New England Journal of Medicine.

About two-thirds of Americans are considered overweight, including about a third who are obese, which is defined as someone whose body mass index, or BMI, is over 30.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Dr. Timothy Beyers is a professor of preventive medicine at the University of Colorado's School of Medicine. He wrote an article to accompany the report in the Journal. Dr. Beyers says there's no magic formula for losing weight.

TIMOTHY BEYERS: If somebody can reduce calories by reducing their frequency with which they're eating, that's great. If another person can reduce their calories in by snacking throughout the day, then that's good for them as well. So I think the answer for a particular person is what works best for them.

MONTAGNE: The doctor says the most important thing is to not let the weight sneak up on you to begin with.

BEYERS: And I know my own life, I've been more sedentary than I should be, and I think that's a good part of the reason why my own weight has been creeping up over the past ten years.

MONTAGNE: Which makes Dr. Timothy Beyers a lot like many of the patients he wants to help.

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