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Astrologers Join Debate of Pluto's Planetary Status

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Astrologers Join Debate of Pluto's Planetary Status

Space

Astrologers Join Debate of Pluto's Planetary Status

Astrologers Join Debate of Pluto's Planetary Status

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5697880/5697881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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At meetings of the International Astronomical Union this week in Prague, the big debate is over how to define a planet — more particularly, how to define Pluto, currently the ninth planet. Recent discoveries have found other objects that seem to have every bit as much of a claim to the name "planet" as Pluto.

But a proposal on the table at the IAU meeting would define "planet" in a way that includes Pluto as well as three others, expanding the number of planets in our solar system to 12.

It turns out that astronomers aren't the only ones who care about Pluto's planetary status. When your view of the future depends on how you read the skies, it becomes all important to know what's what up there. Robert Siegel speaks with Kepler College professor and astrologer Robert Hand about the implications for astrologers.

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